Suboxone Doctors

Locating a doctor that treats opioid addiction may require some extensive research, because not all doctors have the credentials needed to incorporate the use of Suboxone as treatment.
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Suboxone doctors who choose to incorporate the use of Suboxone into their treatment regimens are required to successfully complete an additional 8 hour course in order to obtain the required credentials. What makes it even more difficult is after the doctors gain certification, there will be a limit as to how many individuals they may treat with Suboxone at any given time. However, once doctors gain a year or more of experience, they will be allowed to treat more patients addicted to opioids; however this number will always be limited, due to the extensive rules and regulations regarding Suboxone treatment.

Find Suboxone doctor by state



What is Suboxone (buprenorphine)?


Suboxone is a combination medication that is used to treat opioid addiction. When taken correctly, in tablet form, it is allowed to dissolve under the tongue, or it can be administered as a filmstrip that is placed on the tongue and allowed to dissolve. Buprenorphine is the most important ingredient and it functions as a partial opioid agonist. A partial opioid agonist is an opioid that works to produce fewer effects than that of a full opioid when it attaches to the opioid receptors in the brain.

The other ingredient in Suboxone is naloxone, which is an opioid antagonist, or an opioid blocker. Naloxone is added to Suboxone to discourage individuals from trying to snort or inject the medication, because if that were to happen the naloxone component will quickly travel to the brain and trigger a severe withdrawal syndrome – which if someone experiences once, they will never want to again.

What is Suboxone treatment?


When a partial opioid agonist (Suboxone) is used as treatment, the individual will report a sense of pleasure, or feelings of more energy. Suboxone basically tricks the brain into thinking that a full opioid has been taken, and ultimately works to suppress the withdrawal symptoms and cravings that would otherwise be associated with the substance the individual was addicted to.

Pros of Suboxone treatment


Treating opioid addiction with Suboxone can be greatly beneficial. Suboxone is a long-acting form of medicated-assisted treatment. This means that when Suboxone is taken, it stays in the brain for a full 24 hours, and it will not let any full opioid substances get in. Therefore, each time an individual takes a dose they will have a 24 hour period of reprieve from the dangerous substances. If they can not refrain from taking a full opioid within this 24 hour time period, it will not work and they will not experience the high or get any pain relief, because the Suboxone was still in their system.

In addition, if individuals decided to take more Suboxone than was prescribed in an attempt to get “high” they will not be successful in their endeavor because Suboxone is not a full opioid. If Suboxone is the drug the individual attempts to overdose on; there will be less suppression of breathing and a better chance of survival. Overall, Suboxone can allow those suffering with addiction to regain a normal state of mind that is free of withdrawal symptoms, cravings, and the highs and lows associated with substance use and abuse.

Recently added Suboxone doctors


Dr. Kristen Nelson, MD

16111 Plummer Street
North Hills, CA 91343
818-895-9349
more information

Dr. Brittney Spivak, MD

1025 Pennock Place
Fort Collins, CO 80524
970-495-8800
more information

Dr. Stefani LaFrenierre, MD

250 Arsenal Street
Augusta, ME 04330
207-624-3993
more information

Dr. Elizabeth Mutch, MD

986 Wendam Court
Daytona Beach, FL 32127
386-767-0669
more information

Dr. Colleen Quinn, MD

6201 Roosevelt Road
Berwyn, IL 60402
708-386-0845
more information

Dr. Palav Mehta, MD

401 E Chestnut Street
Louisville, KY 40202
203-482-6172
more information

References


1 - SUBOXONE® (buprenorphine and naloxone) Sublingual Film (CIII)
2 - Suboxone Prescribing Information
3 - Alternative ways to find buprenorphine treatment
4 - Buprenorphine Waiver Management